North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website

Receive useful adoption info and helpful tips and tricks for training your new adopted pet.
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Our dog adoption package is a great value because it includes the spay or neuter surgery, initial vaccinations, flea treatment, microchip and inclusion in national registry, a free vet exam, one month of pet health insurance, personalized ID tag, leash, and collar.
North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website
Photo provided by Flickr
When you adopt an adult dog, you are doing the ultimate good deed. Let's face it: at first a lot of people think they want to find Goldendoodle puppies for sale, but not everyone is lining up to adopt the great adults! Some people might have the misconception that Goldendoodles in shelters have something wrong with them. In fact, most Goldendoodles for adoption end up in shelters not because of any problem with pet behavior or health issues, but because they were dropped off by someone who simply didn't have the time or money to care for the animals. In some cases pets are lost and never found by their owners. These animals are healthy and very eager to please. Did you know that every year, approximately 4 million adoptable animals are killed? A staggering 25% of those animals are purebreds, so you can bet there is a Goldendoodle in need of adoption. North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website
Photo provided by FlickrNorth America's largest non-profit pet adoption website
Photo provided by FlickrFind your next pet at the NKLA Pet Adoption Center in West LA
Photo provided by Flickr
All private shelters will ask you to fill out an adoption application. Sometimes they do this before you’ve met any pets, and other times, they don’t have you do it until you’ve selected a pet you’d like to adopt. All donations will be used for caring for and rehabilitating our rescued dogs and cats. Adopt-A-Pet is a non-profit, tax-deductible community service organization. Please provide a current email so that we may send you a thank you.The Shelter Pet Project, launched in 2009, is a public service ad campaign focused on spreading the word that pets in shelters are wonderful and lovable, and encouraging potential adopters to consider the shelter as the first place to look when acquiring a “new best friend.”Rescue groups sometimes work with only one particular breed or type of pet, but there are many groups that feature all kinds of dogs and cats. The pets usually live in the homes of the members of the organization, so during the adoption process you might be invited to meet them at a central adoption area, such as a weekend event at a pet supply store in a nearby mall.However un-fancy the facility or minimal the staff, the pets in animal control agencies and municipal shelters are just as wonderful as pets in other types of organizations. Walk through the kennels and adoption areas, and keep your eye out for your special someone – odds are, your future best friend is there, waiting for you! 3. FAQ for Dog Veterinarian Visits - Taking your dog to the veterinarian should be your first priority. This is especially true if you have other pets. It's a good idea to make sure your new pet is healthy and doesn't have any diseases or viruses he or she could transmit to other dogs in the house. The best way to find a veterinarian is by word of mouth. The dog shelter or rescue group where you adopted your dog may have a good recommendation. For proper preventative care, your dog should be examined by a veterinarian twice a year. A typical vet checkup includes searching for fleas using a special flea comb. Taking your dog's temperature, and a physical examination which will include checking your dog's ears, eyes, nose, teeth, skin, legs, joints, and genitals, and lymph nodes and listen to the heart and lungs. It will be common for the veterinarian to stress the importance of avoiding parasites, and will suggest options for flea and tick prevention and control.