8 Great Places to Adopt a Pet | Real Simple

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Founded in June 2002, AHS rescues and cares for homeless pets. We take in dogs and cats that have been abused, neglected, abandoned. There are a variety of other reasons people relinquish their dog or cat to us as well: lack of time, moving, allergies, new baby etc. We save those scheduled for euthanasia at other shelters due to their lack of space. Once rehabilitated and ready, they are carefully matched with prospective adopters and placed in loving homes. Over 33,000 pets have been adopted from Animal House Shelter.
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Definition of a No Kill shelter: “No adoptable animal should be euthanized if it can be adopted into a suitable home. Adoptable animals include only those animals eight weeks of age or older that, at or subsequent to the time the animal is impounded or otherwise taken into possession, have manifested no sign of a behavioral or temperamental defect that could pose a health or safety risk or otherwise make the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and have manifested no sign of disease, injury, or congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the health of the animal or that is likely to adversely affect the animal’s health in the future.” To place a hold on a pet, simply come to our shelter and complete an adoption application.
Photo provided by FlickrThe SF SPCA is the place for pet adoptions
Photo provided by FlickrThe Prince William SPCA is assisting the Prince William County Animal Shelter to place adoptable shelter animals on Petfinder
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The "Featured Pets" listing is updated on a weekly basis so please check back regularly for new additions and adoption success stories! This listing represents only a small group of our animals housed at the Prince William County Animal Shelter. Please visit the shelter in person to be sure you meet every one of the animals available for adoptable. The Prince William County Animal Shelter tracks our animals by reference numbers (example: SAR #123). Please provide this reference number (note: listed as the I.D. on Petfinder) when inquiring about a particular animal. Are you considering adopting a cat or kitten? Depending on your age and lifestyle, you may be better off adopting an adult cat rather than a kitten. If you are elderly, work long hours, or have young children, an adult cat may be the best match for your home. If you plan to leave a kitten home alone while you're working, the kitten may become lonely and destructive. An adult cat is usually much calmer and less likely to get into trouble than a kitten. If you lead a very busy lifestyle, consider adopting two cats to keep each other company. Young children move quickly and like to hug pets. As a result, children may accidentally hurt a small kitten or cause a kitten to bite or scratch if it's scared. An adult cat, on the other hand, is more likely to tolerate children and less likely to be injured. Senior citizens are often unprepared for a kitten's energy level and most experts recommend a calm adult or older cat for an elderly household.Adopted dogs make wonderful pets! So many people are told they can only get a dog with a good temperament if they purchase a pure bred from a breeder. This is not true. Dogs at Saving Grace are selected from local shelters where lack of kennel space keeps animals from being placed up for adoption. Before a dog comes into the Saving Grace program, it is evaluated for temperament and suitability as a family pet.