Pets & Animals For Sale in United States - Hoobly Classifieds

(c) A pet dealer shall not sell or offer for sale any animal that is unweaned.
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Most animal lovers are horrified at the thought of keeping their beloved family pet in a dirty wire cage for a second — let alone a week, month or even years. Yet, that is the fate of many animals at large-scale commercial breeding operations across the nation, including the mothers of many puppies and kittens sold in pet shops. In response, more than 200 cities and counties across the nation have banned the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores.
(d) A pet dealer shall not sell or offer for sale any animal that is younger that the minimal age listed.
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Animal advocates say pet store sales fuel the puppy mill industry, where dogs are bred and raised in cramped, unhealthy and inhumane conditions. They have similar concerns about "kitten factories," which are a smaller but growing problem. Efforts to crack down on animal mills have been hindered by limited enforcement resources, so ban proponents are shifting their focus from the supply side to the demand. Far better, they say, to adopt from a local shelter or buy directly from a reputable breeder. (b) any breeder that bred an animal that the pet shop purchased from a broker, whether or not the pet shop offered the animal for sale, and
Photo provided by Flickr(c) any broker from which the pet shop purchased an animal, whether or not the pet shop offered the animal for sale;
Photo provided by FlickrExotic Animals for sale. Looking for exotic animals and pets for sale online than look no further.
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. Prohibition on sale, offer for sale, or purchase for resale of animals by pet shop from certain breeders or brokers; submission of annual report by pet shopsb. Within five days prior to the offering for sale of any animal, the owner or operator of a pet shop, or employee thereof, shall have the animal examined by a veterinarian licensed to practice in the State. The name and address of the examining veterinarian, together with the findings made and treatment, if any, ordered as a result of the examination, shall be noted on the animal history and health certificate for each animal as required by regulations adopted pursuant to Title 56 of the Revised Statutes. If 14 days have passed since the last veterinarian examination of the animal, the owner or operator of the pet shop, or employee thereof, shall have the animal reexamined by a veterinarian licensed to practice in the State as provided for in subsection g. of this section, except as otherwise provided in that subsection.The source of animals available for sale in pet stores is also of grave concern. The Humane Society of the United States (“HSUS”) is concerned that puppies and dogs sold at retail pet stores actually come from puppy mills rather than reputable breeders. Puppy mills are dog breeding operations that aim to maximize profits at the expense of animal welfare. There are many problems with puppy mills, including overcrowding, inbreeding, minimal veterinary care, and the killing of unwanted animals. Every pet shop offering animals for sale shall also post, in a conspicuous location on or near the cage or enclosure for each animal in the cage or enclosure, the USDA inspection reports for the breeder and the broker of the animal for the two years prior to the first day that the animal is offered for sale by the pet shop.
The owner or operator of the pet shop shall regularly update the information required to be posted pursuant to this subsection and make changes as necessary to all signage required by this subsection so that the public has access to the correct information at all times.c. Every pet shop offering animals for sale shall post, in a conspicuous location on the cage or enclosure for each animal in the cage or enclosure, a sign declaring:The source of animals available for sale in pet stores is also of grave concern. The Humane Society of the United States (“HSUS”) is concerned that puppies and dogs sold at retail pet stores actually come from puppy mills rather than reputable breeders. Puppy mills are dog breeding operations that aim to maximize profits at the expense of animal welfare. There are many problems with puppy mills, including overcrowding, inbreeding, minimal veterinary care, and the killing of unwanted animals.