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Recent pet scan showed numerous mets to bones in several area s. Dr wants to do a radioisotope injection. Anyone heard of this?
Also wondering how fast this will progress. Last bone scan In Aug showed nothing.
Thanks
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My onc said the best definitive test for bone mets is MRI. My bone scan showed nothing, the follow up PET scan showed one at T8, but missed the one at L4. MRI showed both T8 and L4 mets. hot sale Pets First MLB New York Mets Pet Bandana
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Background: Standard imaging in early stage PC has focused on detecting metastases (mets) within the abdomen and pelvis. The incidence of IT mets (lung, mediastinal, or supraclavicular) mets is unknown, but presumed to be negligible. Whole body 68Ga-PSMA PET has greater sensitivity compared to conventional imaging, affording the opportunity to estimate the incidence of IT mets. Methods: Newly diagnosed or biochemically recurrent (BCR) PC patients (pts) with apparent localized disease on standard imaging were enrolled on a prospective study of 68Ga-PSMA PET imaging between June 2015 and January 2017 and were analyzed for incidence of IT mets. Positive lesions were defined as uptake higher than blood pool. When appropriate, patients underwent confirmatory biopsy of the PSMA-avid IT lesions. Results: 364 pts underwent 68Ga-PSMA PET imaging, including 121 (33%) pts with newly diagnosed PC and 243 (67%) pts with BCR. 145 pts (40%) had at least 1 PSMA-avid metastasis. PSMA-avid IT mets were detected in 20 pts (5.5% of overall cohort; 13.8% of those with ≥ 1 PET-positive mets), including 3 newly diagnosed (2.5%) pts and 17 (7.0%) pts with BCR. 9 of 20 pts (45%) had IT mets as the only detectable site of metastasis on PET. Biopsy of the PSMA-avid IT lesion was found to harbor PC in 5/5 patients (100%). Sites of detection included: supraclavicular node, n = 9 (2.5%); mediastinal node(s), n = 10 (3.6%), and visceral lung, n = 4 (1.0%). In the entire study cohort of 364 pts, 43% of pts had a Gleason Score ≥ 8 at diagnosis, median PSA was 4.87 ng/mL (range: 0.04 – 83.7), and the median PSA doubling time was 6.2 months (range: 0.4 – 78.3) in patients with BCR. There were no significant differences in PSA, PSA doubling time, Gleason grade, or stage between patients harboring IT metastases vs. those who did not. Conclusions: IT mets are detected by 68Ga-PSMA PET imaging at an appreciable frequency in early stage PC with apparent localized disease by conventional imaging, which may significantly impact management in these cases. Further studies are warranted to validate these findings and determine the optimal strategy for the detection and treatment of supradiaphragmatic metastases in newly diagnosed and biochemically recurrent PC. Clinical trial information: My onc said that my PET scans would show brain mets/activity if there were any.....but I've seen the reports say "base of skull to mid-thigh". Does anyone know if a PET will show brain mets? Background: Standard imaging in early stage PC has focused on detecting metastases (mets) within the abdomen and pelvis. The incidence of IT mets (lung, mediastinal, or supraclavicular) mets is unknown, but presumed to be negligible. Whole body 68Ga-PSMA PET has greater sensitivity compared to conventional imaging, affording the opportunity to estimate the incidence of IT mets. Methods: Newly diagnosed or biochemically recurrent (BCR) PC patients (pts) with apparent localized disease on standard imaging were enrolled on a prospective study of 68Ga-PSMA PET imaging between June 2015 and January 2017 and were analyzed for incidence of IT mets. Positive lesions were defined as uptake higher than blood pool. When appropriate, patients underwent confirmatory biopsy of the PSMA-avid IT lesions. Results: 364 pts underwent 68Ga-PSMA PET imaging, including 121 (33%) pts with newly diagnosed PC and 243 (67%) pts with BCR. 145 pts (40%) had at least 1 PSMA-avid metastasis. PSMA-avid IT mets were detected in 20 pts (5.5% of overall cohort; 13.8% of those with ≥ 1 PET-positive mets), including 3 newly diagnosed (2.5%) pts and 17 (7.0%) pts with BCR. 9 of 20 pts (45%) had IT mets as the only detectable site of metastasis on PET. Biopsy of the PSMA-avid IT lesion was found to harbor PC in 5/5 patients (100%). Sites of detection included: supraclavicular node, n = 9 (2.5%); mediastinal node(s), n = 10 (3.6%), and visceral lung, n = 4 (1.0%). In the entire study cohort of 364 pts, 43% of pts had a Gleason Score ≥ 8 at diagnosis, median PSA was 4.87 ng/mL (range: 0.04 – 83.7), and the median PSA doubling time was 6.2 months (range: 0.4 – 78.3) in patients with BCR. There were no significant differences in PSA, PSA doubling time, Gleason grade, or stage between patients harboring IT metastases vs. those who did not. Conclusions: IT mets are detected by 68Ga-PSMA PET imaging at an appreciable frequency in early stage PC with apparent localized disease by conventional imaging, which may significantly impact management in these cases. Further studies are warranted to validate these findings and determine the optimal strategy for the detection and treatment of supradiaphragmatic metastases in newly diagnosed and biochemically recurrent PC. Clinical trial information: I agree with Bon..you need more testing. An MRI would be best since you've already had a PET and bone scan. Both scans can pick up things other than mets so a MRI would give another view.