Related: Best Reptile Pet Shops In San Francisco.

San Francisco passes law forcing all pet shops to ..
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“Most animal lovers are horrified at the thought of keeping their beloved family pet in a dirty wire cage for a second — let alone a week, month or even years. Yet, that is the fate of many animals at large-scale commercial breeding operations across the nation, including the mothers of many puppies and kittens sold in pet shops,” the San Francisco Board of Supervisors wrote in an op-ed piece in . “In response, more than 200 cities and counties across the nation have banned the sale of dogs and cats in pet stores.”
The Best 10 Pet Stores for 2017 in San Francisco, CA - Yelp
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Step 2: Gauge Employee Response at San Francisco Pet Shops and Wholesale Pet Supply Centers
Some pet stores hire uneducated employees for minimum wage. These employees aren't necessarily knowledgeable or concerned for your welfare or your pet's wellness. Better, specialized pet stores hire people who are interested in the pet care industry and are true animal lovers, and thus, informed. If you need any advice about pet supplies or wholesale pet care, the latter type of pet shop is your better bet. So when you're asking the questions from the list above, pay attention to the attitude and proficiency of the pet supplies dealer you're speaking with. Pet Stores in San Francisco - Yelp
Photo provided by FlickrThe Best Pet Stores in San Francisco on Yelp
Photo provided by FlickrBest Pet stores that sell dogs in San Francisco, CA - Yelp
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San Francisco decided last week to ban the sale of non-rescue dogs and cats in pet shops. The measure is intended to prevent the distribution of animals that come from large-scale puppy and kitten mills. It also encourages adopting pets from the city’s animal shelters.San Francisco follows the lead of Los Angeles, San Diego, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston and Austin, which all have similar measures, along with the ban of the sale of animals under eight weeks old. Mimi Bekhechi, PETA’s director of international programmes praised the vote saying, “With this vote, San Francisco has proved itself to be the city of love for millions of dogs and cats in desperate need of homes. Pet shops’ greed fuels the cruel commercial breeding industry that keeps female dogs and cats prisoner inside filthy wire cages – whose only purpose is to churn out litters of inbred puppies and kittens who are then taken away from them, transported hundreds of miles, and sold.”In an effort to put an end to “inhumane” puppy breeding mills in the city, San Francisco has just passed a law requiring all pet shops to no longer sell dogs and cats that haven’t been rescued. This measure, however, will not affect licensed breeders, only those operating a large-scale breeding operation that produces thousands of animals that already occupy the city’s shelters.Wanting to end the cycle of abuse in San Francisco, lawmakers proposed to ban the sale of non-rescue dogs and cats. Furthermore, it’ll help facilitate adoption of animals already occupying the city’s shelters. The measure was sponsored by and garnered unanimous support; it passed in mid February. Puppy mills are out of the picture, San Francisco pet shops are still able to sell animals from licensed breeders.The vote also bans future pet shops from opening to inhumanely sell illegally breeded animals. District Supervisor Katy Tang, who also sponsored the proposition, told The Independent, “This ordinance will serve as a deterrent, preventing a business from moving into San Francisco and selling animals from irresponsible mass-producing breeders that churn out puppies and kittens as if they were on an assembly line.”San Francisco follows the lead of Los Angeles, San Diego, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston and Austin, which all have similar measures, along with the ban of the sale of animals under eight weeks old. Mimi Bekhechi, PETA’s director of international programmes praised the vote saying, “With this vote, San Francisco has proved itself to be the city of love for millions of dogs and cats in desperate need of homes. Pet shops’ greed fuels the cruel commercial breeding industry that keeps female dogs and cats prisoner inside filthy wire cages – whose only purpose is to churn out litters of inbred puppies and kittens who are then taken away from them, transported hundreds of miles, and sold.”