Petco: Pet Stores & Supplies | Dog & Cat Food

Three ways to get more info about owning your own Pet Supplies Plus store.
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Commercial breeders in all states who sell wholesale to pet stores are required to be regulated by the USDA. Some states (such as Missouri and Pennsylvania) also require a state kennel license and state inspections. This does not mean that puppies from Missouri or Pennsylvania are healthier. In fact, these states have two of the worst concentrations of puppy mills in the United States.
Gallery: Some of the dogs currently for sale at Roseville Pet Store in the HarMar Mall.
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Our store is locally owned by Mark Martin and has been serving the Athens area for over 10 years. Our Store Team Leader is Kathie Wickwire. She has been with our store since it opened. Over the years Kathie has shared her home with 3 cats, 10 dogs, numerous fish, 2 parakeets and a few hamsters. Her current house mates are Dakota, a purebred Siberian Husky and Charlie, a Tennessee Brown Dog. Come by and let us introduce you to our other team members and let's talk pets. Gallery: Sarah Johnson and John Larsen held a 2 1/2 month old English Bulldog at Roseville Pet Store in the HarMar Mall.
Photo provided by FlickrGallery: Nate Vo and Mari Gavino held some of the dogs for sale at Roseville Pet Store in the HarMar Mall.
Photo provided by FlickrGallery: Nate Vo and Mari Gavino held some of the dogs for sale at Roseville Pet Store in the HarMar Mall.
Photo provided by Flickr
To the editor: The Times is correct to support a state bill to ban pet stores from selling cats, dogs and rabbits bred for that purpose. (“,” editorial, July 5)The Times did not inform readers of stringent California laws that go above and beyond federal standards for pet stores. It did not acknowledge that AB 485 makes the state’s warranty law for pet stores unenforceable. It neglected to mention stricter sourcing requirements that we have proposed. To the editor: The Times’ editorial in support of Assembly Bill 485 relied not on data or current pet store laws, but instead activist ideology. The Times regretfully did not use data provided by my organization in its editorial. When the city of Los Angeles barred pet stores from selling commercially bred cats, dogs, and rabbits, it required instead that animals sold in stores come from shelters, humane societies and rescue groups. The purpose was to end Angelenos' complicity with cruel breeders and puppy mills, and to encourage the adoption of animals in need of rescue. A fine idea, but the ordinance, which passed in late 2012, prompted an unforeseen zoning problem.The editorial cited pet sale bans in 200 jurisdictions nationwide. Our count shows that 75% of those jurisdictions did not have a pet store prior to passage; in other words, the bans were for show. The one in Los Angeles has had, at best, mixed results, which we told The Times. Again, readers were left uninformed.It's time for all this legal growling to be put to rest. Most pet stores are in commercial areas because that's where people shop. And there's no good reason for humane stores not to be there as well. On Wednesday, the city council's Personnel and Animal Welfare Committee (PAW — funny) recommended that the city pass an ordinance specifically exempting pet stores from falling under the definition of “kennel” in the zoning code even if the shops have four or more adult dogs. The council should have done that when it passed the humane store ordinance.