Types of Parrots - All Pet Birds

May 18, 2017 - There are many types of pet birds and all have their own unique personalities!
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Sunflower – There are two types of sunflower seeds that you can offer to your pet bird, these are the black oil sunflower seed and the stripes sunflower seed. The black oil has thinner shell that is very easy for birds to crack open. This type is the one normally offered as bird food. The striped ones have thicker shell that makes some birds lose interest on eating them.
All About Birds, bird information and bird identification with a list of bird types from pet birds and exotic birds to birds of prey and more
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As you learn all about the different types of pet birds, you'll quickly start figuring out which bird species you really like. You may fall in love with a particular bird for its color, or maybe you really want one that you can train to talk or perform tricks. Maybe you just love to listen to birds, or want to watch their crazy antics. Types of Pet Birds Conures | have to spend too much in terms of pet food if you have birds. Birds ...
Photo provided by FlickrAll About Birds, bird information and bird identification with a list of bird types from pet birds and exotic birds to birds of prey and more
Photo provided by FlickrAll About Birds, bird information and bird identification with a list of bird types from pet birds and exotic birds to birds of prey and more
Photo provided by Flickr
Since there are so many types of pet birds it is usually possible to find one that suits you and your life style – if you are willing to do some research. Simply walking into a pet shop and getting any bird that looks nice is not a clever way to go about. Some types of pet birds will for instance live for 50 years or more – are you ready for that type of commitment? Other types of pet birds are incredibly noisy (or adorably chatty, if you are the right person for such a bird) and can disturb their keeper as well as any neighbours. Some birds grow really big and require expensive cages or even aviaries, while others are so clever that they succumb to depression and lethargy in a boring household where they aren’t given any intricate puzzles to solve. There are also birds that must be kept in pairs or groups, especially if you plan on ever leaving them home alone. These are just a few things that you have to take into account when choosing a pet bird. There are roughly 370 known species of parrot and many different types of pet birds belong to this group. African greys, budgerigars (“budgies”), parakeets, rosellas, lovebirds, parrotlets, caiques, cockatoos, cockatiels, conures, pionus birds, macaws, and amazons – they are all parrots. Most parrots live in tropical and subtropical climates but there are actually a few temperate species as well. The greatest diversity of parrots is found in South America and Australasia.

All species of Parrots are protected by CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). As of 2009, 56 parrot varieties are listed in CITES appendix I (endangered species) and all the other ones are listed in appendix II (vulnerable species).

Fortunately, many parrot species are today successfully bred in captivity which means that you can get this type of pet bird without depleting wild populations. All true finches belong to the family Fringillidae, but many types of pet birds from other families have the word finch in their common name since they look similar to the true finches. Two of the most commonly kept pet true finches are Zebra finch (Poephila guttata) and Society finch (Lonchura domestica). The House finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) also has a history of being kept as a pet and the populations found in Eastern and Midwestern United States hail from released and escaped pet finches. Finches are known to having strong and stubby beaks; an adaptation to a diet consisting chiefly of hard seeds. The Cockatiel, Nymphicus hollandicus, is a small Australian cockatoo. The name is derived from kakatielje, which means “small cockatoo” in Dutch. This bird is also known as Quarrion bird and Weiro bird. Cockatiels inhabit the Australian outback, including scrublands, bushlands and wetlands. They are nomadic and will move from place to place to find new food and water. In the wild, cockatiels live in pairs or small flocks, but desirable spots such as water holes can attract hundreds of cockatiels at a time. Since this is such a social bird it will appreciate the company of fellow cockatiels in captivity. Like many other types of pet bird it can bond strongly to its human keeper even when kept with other birds.